Poisons and Toxins in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Poisons and Toxins in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Poisons and Toxins in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Poisons and Toxins in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs can be food items like chocolate, grapes/raisins and chewing gums, household items, plants like cannabis and palm, OTC like asperin, pesticides, your prescription medication and many more. I will maintain a list of some of the common ones I see in my practice, so keep checking the page from time to time and join my newsletter for news alerts

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning  in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning  in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, NSAID is an acronym that stands for “non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.” This class of drugs includes popular pain, ache, swell, anti-clotting,  and anti-inflammatory medication such as Aspirin, ibuprofen, Advil, Motrin, and Aleve.

Asperin NSAID Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, Unfortunately, those drugs are often manufactured as a palatable chew or are sweeten which makes it a prize treat for your bulldog and French bulldog pet.

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs Common SIDE EFFECTS are:Poisons and Toxins in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Gastric Ulcer leading to:

  1. Pain
  2. Nausea, vomiting and diarrhea
  3. Gastric bleeding and gastric perforation leading to peritonitis and possible death

Kidney Failure Leading to:

  1. Depress and Listless
  2. Excessive drinking and urinating
  3. Anorexic

Blood Clotting problems leading to

  1. Pale gums/anemia
  2. Bleeding and bruising
  3. Weakness and panting

Other: liver toxicity and seizures.

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs DIAGNOSIS:

  1. Abdominal imaging like radiographs and ultrasound
  2. Blood tests and urine analysis

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs TREATMENT:

  1. Induce Vomit
  2. H2B medication like Pepcid to reduce stomach acid (anti-acids)
  3. Gastric protectants to prevent absorption
  4. IV fluids to preserve the kidneys and maintain hydration
  5. Blood transfusion if needed
  6. Emergency surgery if gastric wall is perforated.

Aspirin NSAID Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs DO NOT:

DO NOT Give your bulldog any human NSAID’s
DO NOT Keep NSAID’s uncovered bottle or areas accessible to your bulldog
DO NOT Give your bulldog pet NASID’s without consulting your vet first

Xylitol Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Xylitol Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, Xylitol is a natural sweetener that most of you are familiar with and likely using or indgesting in some capacity in your everyday life. Xylitolis used extensively as a replacer for the common sugar due to its low caloric and glycemic index. Xylitol can be found in the low-calorie food section at your local grocery, at the weight management and diabetic section, and at the dental-care section.
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Xylitol Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, common products that have Xylitol in them:Xylitol Poising in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs,

  • Toothpaste & Mouthwash.
  • Chewing gum & Sugar-Free candy
  • PEANUT BUTTER & Jellies
  • Chocolate & Breath Mints
  • CHILDREN VITAMINS
  • A long list of food products advertised for their “Sugar-Free, “Low Sugar”, “Natural Sweetener”, “Aspartame Free”, “Low Calorie”, etc.
  • Dental products advertising “anti-cavity”, “anti tooth decay” etc.

Xylitol Poising in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs POISON CONTROL

  1. Safely store all Xiltol containing products
  2. Safely cap all Xiltol containing products
  3. Safely hang, close and cap your hang bags, purse, pockets, and its content.
  4. Don’t let your dog loose in a picnic, parks or other public areas.
  5. Don’t use your own toothpaste or Dental Rinse on your bulldog. Dr. Kraemer offers multiple Bully dental PlaqueLess rinses and chews that are safe to use
  6. If you use peanut butter to hide and administer Rx or supplements carefully read the label for any trace of Xylitol
  7. If you have children who you offer multivitamin sweetened tab or chews educate them about the risk it possesses to your bulldog

Xylitol Toxicity in bulldog and French bulldogs CLINICAL SIGNES

Even trace amount of Xylitol can be toxic to your so If you suspect that your bulldog and French bulldog ate a xylitol-containing product, please seek veterinary help ASAP
Due to the immediate hypoglycemic effect of Xylitol ingestion, your bulldog is likely to exhibit:

  • Weakness
  • Depression
  • Tremors & Seizure
  • Hypoglycemic coma
  • Liver toxicity and failure
  • Death

Xylitol Toxicity in bulldog and French bulldogs DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

There is no specific test of Xylitol Toxicity
Low blood sugar, clinical signs listed above and any suspicion of your bulldog digesting a Xylitol product and should prompt Xylitol Toxicity as a high likelihood and immediate course of action

There is also no specific antidote to xylitol, the treatment is symptomatic and supportive

  1. Possible induce vomiting
  2. IV fluid mixed with dextrose (sugar-like) to help raise blood sugar if hypoglycemic
  3. Liver detoxifiers and other protective rx and supplements

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs can happen due to ingestion of any amounts of grape containing products including raisins, cereals or granola with raisins

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs are renal toxic (i.e. Kidney Toxic)  but the exact cause within the grape is not known (possibly a grape fungus). Clinical signs can start in 12-48h and may include vomit, diarrhea, excessive drinking and urination and other symptoms related to kidney failure.

TIP: the sooner treatment begun the better, so if you have any suspicion of your bulldog ingesting grape containing product, please call poison control  and go to your nearest emergency.

Tragically, a severe case of grape poisoning might lead to a complete shut down of your bulldog kidneys and death.

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs  DIAGNOSIS:

Unfortunately, clinical signs are not specific, but blood and urine tests will show abnormalities consistent with renal failure.

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs PROGNOSIS:

Prognosis depends on many factors such as your dog sensitivity to the poison, the amount ingested, duration from ingestion time to treatment initiation, etc.

Grapes and Raisins Poisoning in Bulldogs TREATMENT:

inducing vomiting, stomach lavage, and coating the stomach wall with a protectant that prevents poison absorption/digestion is ideal but timing is critical. Hospitalization on fluid therapy and kidney values monitoring will be needed.

WARNING: Unfortunately, regardless of size, age, gender and breed every dog tolerance is different, thus even small amounts (1-2 grapes) can be toxic .

Any amount ingested should be considered an emergency. 

Rat Poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Rat Poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs , there are three types of rat poison but the most common are the anticoagulants and bromethalin ones (the third one is cholecalciferol). All three should be considered life-threatening emergencies thus require immediate treatment.Rat poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs:

Timing is critical,  removing the poison by inducing vomiting and coating the stomach to prevent its absorption is only effective soon after ingestion.

Rat Poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, ANTICOAGULANTS prevents your bulldog blood from clotting thus cause uncontrolled bleeding. Unfortunately, Warfarin anticoagulants (first generation) are now often replaced with more potent ones. Clinical signs can take a few days to manifest with your bulldog exhibiting lethargy, dark stool, frank blood from dripping from any orifice, pale gums and bruising easily seen on the belly and gums. Your veterinarian can often confirm the poisoning and related clotting deficiency by running a lab panel that includes clotting factors.  The bleeding can be reversed with Vitamin K given by injections and orally. At times your bulldog might need a blood transfusion, oxygen support, and hospitalization. The prognosis is good if treatment started early.

Rat Poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs BROMMETHALIN poisoning affects the CNS manifested by swelling (edema) in the brain. Clinical signs in a bulldog who ingested this type of rat poison can start quickly as early as 24h from ingestion, it usually manifested with seizures, tremors, anorexia, and depression. Unfortunately, there is no antidote for this poison thus supportive therapy with IV fluid and medication to reduce the brain swell is all that can be done. If the pet survives, they often don’t want to eat for an extended time and will need to be supported and fed.

Rat Poison in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs PREVENTION: Prevention is key, be watchful for dead mice and rats, and remove them before your bulldog gets to them. If you place rat poison in your home or business always make sure that pet’s cant reaches it.

Sago Palm Poisoning in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs

Sago Palm in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, there are a lot of poisonous plants out there, but few cause fatalities in bulldogs and French bulldogs like this one. Unfortunately, I personally experienced two tragic cases in my practice one a young French bulldog puppy of Sago Palm poisoning. All parts of the Sago Palms are poisonous, but their seeds are exceptionally deadly, the poison is “cycasin” and even ingestion of few seeds can be catastrophic.

Sago Palm in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs WARNING: I have seen the Sago Palm’s in my neighborhood yards (southern Ca) and local nurseries (see the photo I snapped at a nearby home depot store). Be aware, Bonsai Sago Palm’s are also popular as a house decorative items and gifts.

Sago Palm poisoning clinical manifestation can begin quickly thus if you suspect that your pet ingested any parts of this plant please seek emergency care immediately.

Sago Palm in Bulldogs and French Bulldogs CLINICAL SIGNS:

Evidence of you bulldog poisoned by this plant might begin as gastrointestinal like vomit and diarrhea but then can quickly progress to

  1. Weeakness
  2. Bloody vomit, and diarrhea
  3. Icterus (yellow gums and mucous membrane due to liver failure)
  4. Seizures, inappetence, shock, and death.

Bulldog Sago Palm Poisoning TREATMENT: 

1. If you can get to an emergency hospital right away try to induce vomiting with oral hydrogen peroxide or Ipecac
2. Treatment will include inducing vomiting, stomach pumping, and stomach protective coating to hopefully remove the poison before it gets into your bulldog system.
3. Supportive therapy is all we can do to improve survival (there is no antidote) and will include:

If you are a pet owner I recommend removing those plants from your home and year.

 

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